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By Ann Marie Shillito This second post is about creating Ava’s accessories and garments, about my digital and VR process producing her accessories, while Little Peril Studio’s Megan Mackay created our avatars’ gorgeous garments. This image is Ava, my avatar and one of six created for the HiddenFloors project introduced in my first post. HiddenFloors was an amazing project to be part of. I gained so much from this project as it offered the opportunity to be more expansive, to scale up, play in new ways and collaborate with designers in the fashion sector. I wanted to explore further the potential for creating virtual piecesRead More →

From the HiddenFloors project, a virtual fashion event with 6 model avatars, this image shows Ava avatar modelling a shiny lilac coloured skin-tight top and shorts under a full length diaphanous lilac coloured gown created by Little Peril Studio. Her huge and sumptuous head dress of flowing multicoloured swirls floats above her red hair and as she walks she is followed by numerous colourful flying pet objects. She also wears a large decorative front piece of shiny metallic swirls.

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HiddenFloors Project showcases world-wide the collaborations of 12 amazing fashion designers and applied artists, using digital & immersive media to connect to audiences & international buyers without the costs and environmental impact of travel and organising physical exhibitions and runway shows.

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Sustainable products from explorations Sustainable me means Ann Marie having valuable time, space and a smidgen of time pressure to not only explore and experiment with different processes and materials but to also add value to the abundant waste and scrap around us and create things that others can own and treasure. A VACMA award gave Ann Marie Shillito just this. Closing the Loop‘s “MATTER | Earth, Material and Making” exhibition at the Barn gave purpose and a deadline. Fold, the shop at the Barn, gave an Ann Marie the opportunity to develop her explorations into finished pieces. The image on the left shows aRead More →

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Ann Marie Shillito intends within this series of posts to provide information on the purpose and methods behind work she made for “MATTER,” Closing the Loop’s exhibition. WIthin her work she is finding creative solutions towards zero waste within her practice as a maker where 3D printing adds desirability and value to waste materials.

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This post is part one of a series to provide information to complement Ann Marie Shillito’s work, some currently in Closing the Loop’s ‘MATTER: Earth, Material + Making’ exhibition, at the Barn, Banchory, Scotland. This is about the process behind her work exploring environmental wellbeing through making, cherishing our resources, repurposing waste material.

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OK. What do you think about men wearing jewellery? Generally. This is Terry sporting a statement pin to complement his gorgeous jacket. We think he looks stunning. We also loved that Shaun Leane, one of the two judges for ‘All That Glitters: Britain’s Next Jewellery Star’, wore different pieces of his own designed collection at each session. The earrings that he wore are so much more interesting, imaginative and distinctive than much of jewellery advertised for men. I would expect this of Shaun Leane as a designer who has worked with Alexander McQueen – but his jewellery is very discreet compared to Terry’s pin. AreRead More →

The Path to Making Jewellery

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A mini-series of short stories by Designers and Makers. ~ Part 2 ~ Ann Marie Shillito – her Lockdown Project. Creativity is so important for our mental health and wellbeing. Over the past year especially, we’ve all become so much more aware of this. Having something to focus on other than work and the news, gives a chance for our minds to declutter. According to the Zen Habits website picking up a creative hobby can contribute towards living a more fulfilling life. Serious ‘play’. The idea of full time crafts people having a creative outlet might seem strange, however having time to switch off fromRead More →

3D Printed jewellery with a twist. Birgit has an incredible gift for creating 3D printed jewellery that is a little bit different. Playful, quirky and full of character, she often uses Anarkik 3D software to design her pieces, 3D Prints her models and hand finishes them with colourful dyes. Video below of Birgit’s Anarkik Creations jewellery: “What keeps coming back in my work, and which has become very important for me, is the strong, pure line. Through form, in which my ideas are expressed, apparently I strive for a certain aesthetic. I love to be playful and humorous, I work with projects and choose subjectsRead More →

Exhibition at Double Doors Studios, June 2021 To say we are pretty excited is a bit of an understatement. Restrictions are easing up in Scotland, and three of the Jewellery Designer/ Makers associated with Anarkik Creations Jewellery are taking part in an exhibition. Even more exciting, and all being well it will be an in-person exhibition! ‘100 Jewels By 100 Women’ hosted by Dundee’s newest creative enterprise and exhibition space Double Door Studios will celebrate 100 talented craftswomen who have worked, studied or lived in Dundee, Scotland, by showcasing 100 pieces of their jewellery. Who: Jewellery Designer/ Makers Ann Marie Shillito, Lizzie Armour, and GennaRead More →

From bumble beginnings.. “For many years I have admired, bought and been gifted Ann Marie’s work. From her early titanium earrings, brooches and necklaces to her current 3D Printed jewellery. The honey bee pin with it’s very life like bee sitting on honeycomb is possibly my favourite piece in all of my collection.”  Protecting our beeautiful world. Ann Marie Shillito is an established Jeweller based in Edinburgh, Scotland. Her work has changed over time but her values as a person and a designer are rooted in causes for protecting our environment. She is part of the Applied Arts Scotland (AAS)/Creative Infomatics ‘Closing the Loop’ projectRead More →

Behind the scenes and jewellery with Anarkik Creations Jeweller, Ann Earls Boylan. Herstory The history of women working from home is rather complicated. Before the industrial revolution in the U.K., it was common for women to run their businesses, or employment directly from the household.  “Engaged in cottage-based industries such as spinning and weaving or plied their trades from workshops that were either in or attached to domestic dwellings. Many married couples ran inns and coffee houses or kept shops. In all cases, no line was rigidly drawn between ‘home’ and ‘work’.” – Dr Helen McCarthy https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/blog/complicated-history-women-working-home/   Now the lines are blurred for aRead More →